Dealing  With  the  2022  Supreme  Court Decision  re:  Abortions
 

            The Supreme Court decision which reversed Roe v. Wade threatens to drag America down into a pit that will be so bitterly divisive, disruptive, and destructive, that it can only be compared to the era which led to the Civil War. And the timing is absolutely terrible, since: (i) half the nation is trying to recover from an attempt to literally overthrow and destroy our constitutional government; (ii) the other half keeps clinging angrily to outright lies about the 2020 election; and, (iii) the opportunities we have, to try to get ready for the approaching onslaughts of global warming, out-of-control deficits and debts, a likely major recession, and more political unrest, are dwindling and dissipating, rapidly.

            The following proposals are offered as my best effort to describe a strategy for how Democrats can and should respond to the Supreme Court decision. The two buttons directly below can be used to download either of the following:


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The rest of this page contains the text of the 1-page introduction/summary version of this proposal:
 

1. Democrats in Congress should propose – and ask Republicans to tolerate – a “transition period”, to allow the nation to adapt to the new decision.

            Rather than asking Republicans to adopt “the trimester system” (as set forth in Roe v. Wade) as federal law, Democrats in Congress should ask the Republicans to tolerate, and allow, “a transition period”, to give people time to adapt to the new set of laws. It was easy for even pro-choice female GOP Senators to come up with reasons for refusing to adopt Roe v. Wade. By contrast, it would be much, MUCH harder for them to refuse to allow some sort of logical, reasonable, appropriate transition, from one legal status, to a very different legal status. Any voter can understand the need for an appropriate transition, to allow people time to adjust their lives, in the face of an abrupt discontinuity. If Republicans refuse to allow even that, they will make themselves look abusive, uncompassionate, and driven solely by dogma. The moderates will recognize that, and can be persuaded to act accordingly.

 

2. The Requested Transition Could Propose That Every State Should Hold a Referendum on Abortion Rights, This Coming November, 2022

            Skilled political operatives will need to create detailed proposals, for how they think “a transition period” should function. One proposal I hereby nominate, for their consideration, would provide a limited amount of federal money to help the states organize and conduct referendums, this coming November, which would allow the voters of each state to vote, directly, on simplified, yes-or-no, up-or-down choices, to either: (i) adopt “the trimester system” (as set forth in Roe v. Wade) for that state; or, (ii) ban abortions in that state (with two additional clauses also on those ballots, to let the voters say whether they want to allow exceptions for rape, and/or incest).

            A SECOND proposal which I also nominate – for consideration by Democrats who will be negotiating with Republican Senators for support, to overcome the filibuster – would say that EACH COUNTY within any state – possibly on a mandatory nationwide basis; or, possibly to be decided by each state – would get to make its own county-specific decision, to either: (i) adopt the trimester system; or, (ii) ban abortions entirely, within that county. There are huge and critical differences between URBAN life, attitudes, and beliefs, versus RURAL life, attitudes and beliefs, and politicians need to do more, to respect those differences. In Missouri, the voters in St. Louis, and Kansas City, clearly would vote to keep the trimester system in place, in those counties, while most RURAL voters probably would ban abortion, in their counties. Jefferson City, Columbia, Springfield, etc.? Let THEM make THEIR choices, either way.

            And, for complex reasons, THAT actually might be a good thing, for ALL of those places . . .

Contains a single stand-alone page, with the text that appears below.

Contains more explanation, plus several additional proposals.

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